pamela gellerIt’s a religious requirement under Islam to fund jihad. Which is why we saw every major Muslim group in America (CAIR, ICNA, ISNA, MAS, MSA et al) named un-indicted co-conspirators in the largest terror funding trial in our nation’s history — the Holy Land trial.

Once again, Canada is leading the way — a light unto nations:

Many Islamic charities in the United States and around the world have been shut down for funding terrorism, including what was once the largest Islamic charity in the United States, the Holy Land Foundation for Relief and Development (HLF), as well as the Global Relief Foundation (GRF), the Benevolence International Foundation (BIF), and many others. And ISNA has admitted ties to Hamas and the Muslim Brotherhood. So this is no surprise. “Star Investigation: Federal audit raises concern that Canadian charity funded terror,” by Jesse McLean for Toronto Star, July 25:

Money raised by an Islamic charity created to help Canada’s poor and needy instead went overseas, potentially into the hands of violent militants, a government audit has found.The federal charity watchdog is now threatening to revoke the charity status of Mississauga’s ISNA (Islamic Society of North America) Development Foundation.

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A Canada Revenue Agency audit revealed the foundation shipped more than $280,000 to a Pakistan-based agency, cash the government fears went to supporting the Hizbul Mujahideen — a militant group that seeks the secession of Kashmir from India.

The foundation “facilitated the transfer of resources that may have been used to support the efforts of a political organization . . . and its armed wing,” the CRA said in a letter to the charity outlining its findings, obtained by the Star.

“Canada’s commitment to combating terrorism extends to preventing organizations with ties to terrorism from benefiting from the tax advantages of charitable registration,” the CRA letter said.

The charity’s acting president dismissed the suggestion that the money it gave to the Pakistan-based Relief Organization for Kashmiri Muslims may have landed in the wrong hands because of poor oversight.

“The money did not go to any groups who were freedom fighters,” G. Nabi Chaudhary said. “We made sure that all of the money the charity sent to those organizations was spent on the needy, to help the misplaced. We had people on the ground who were working with the relief organizations.”

But the charity failed to show auditors any documents proving it had control over how the money was spent, as the tax agency requires.

Contradicting Chaudhary’s assurance the money was carefully spent, the charity’s board members told auditors the funds were sent abroad with “no strings.”

In fact, the sole scrap of evidence the charity said it had on how its money was spent overseas — photographs appearing to show relief work being done on behalf of the ISNA Development Foundation — was “altered,” auditors said.

A forensic examination determined the pictures of men performing relief work with a banner depicting ISNA Development Foundation in the background had been doctored after they were taken, specifically around the banner.

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The charity’s directors told auditors their knowledge of the relief work done in Kashmir is based solely on these photographs.

“Once the money left Canada, (the foundation) had no control over the money, how it was spent or what it was to be spent on,” board members said, according to the CRA.

The CRA’s audit probed the charity’s operations for a three-year period, from 2007 through 2009. Since then, the foundation has sent more than $80,000 to Pakistan….

Pamela Geller is the Editor of Atlas Shrugs and a regular contributor to The D.C. Clothesline.