A  group of AP language students at Brighton High School spent a full school day wearing hijabs, the headdress worn by Muslim women in many parts of the world.  AP students, our brightest …..

The exercise gave students a chance to learn about an unfamiliar culture and religion. But in a school community where no students and only one teacher outwardly practice Islam, wearing the scarves was a good way to draw curious looks, questions and a few unfriendly comments.

“A few unfriendly comments.” What exactly? That they look silly? Well, they do.

More victimhood, more dawah, more proselytizing in our public schools. We never see this done  with Hinduism, Judaism, Christianity, etc., but we see it with this ideology. This propaganda is shoved down our throats and our children’s throats, an ideology  that has done more harm and destruction to this country in the 21st century than any other on the face of the earth.

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Where are the school lessons on the 1,400 years of jihadi wars, land appropriations, cultural annihilations and enslavements? Where are the women studies programs on the misogyny inherent in Islam — honor killings, child marriage, forced marriage, women as property? Parents must stop this inculcation in our public schools by idiot teachers.

This story is from December, but I did not see it until now.

Michigan students go Muslims

“Brighton High School students don hijabs to explore literature, religion and identity,” Michigan Radio News,  (thanks to Creeping) December 16, 2013

Maybe more than any other, high school can be a time when what you choose to wear has a huge impact on your sense of identity.

As students take their first steps into adulthood, they walk a fine line between fitting in with their peers and developing a unique sense of self.

Earlier this fall, a group of AP language students at Brighton High School were asked to read a memoir by Iranian author Azar Nafisi. The book detailed the experiences of women during that country’s religious revolution, including dealing with new standards of modesty in the way they dressed.

To experience the material first-hand, several girls in the class in Brighton chose to spend a full school day wearing hijabs, the head-scarves worn by Muslim women in many parts of the world.

The exercise gave students a chance to learn about an unfamiliar culture and religion. But in a school community where no students and only one teacher outwardly practice Islam, wearing the scarves was a good way to draw curious looks, questions and a few unfriendly comments.

Teacher Diana Mason and three students at Brighton who took part recently told Stateside about the experience.

 John Klein Wilson, Michigan Radio Newsroom

Pamela Geller is the Editor of PamelaGeller.com

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