This post originally appeared at Fellowship of the Minds

Federal government contractors, such as defense contractors for the Department of Defense (DOD), require national security clearance.

The FBI is responsible for vetting government contractors, by looking into applicants’ criminal history, financial records and foreign contacts.

But a recent DOD report found that in the last 3 years, 165 government contractors with felonies, influences from foreign governments, suspicious financial dealings, and even pedophilia were given national security clearance and thus, had access to top secret information.

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Sundeep Kavanal Radesh reports for International Business Times that according to the report, obtained by NBC News on January 23, 2018:

  • In the past three years, 200,000 defense contractors had requested top secret national security clearance.
  • Of the 200,000 applicants, 486 were denied or revoked:
    • 370 of the 486 denials were due to “financial considerations”.
    • 63 denials were due to felonies.
    • 56 applicants were found to have evidence of foreign influence.
    • However, 165 of the 486 defense contractor applicants who were denied security clearance had slipped through the initial vetting process and, thus, had access to sensitive information for years before their access eventually was revoked. An example is an individual who was granted interim security clearance in 2015, but was revoked in 2017 after it was discovered he had raped a child before applying for clearance.

A former FBI official said interim or provisional security clearances are often necessary for many agencies to fill their jobs. An example is Jared Kushner, President Trump’s senior adviser and son-in-law, who has not been given a permanent clearance, but has been operating with an interim security clearance for over a year, according to two law enforcement sources. Kushner’s interim clearance allows him to attend the President’s Daily Briefing.

 

 

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