Between 1945 and 1962, the U.S. conducted 210 atmospheric nuclear tests. They used multiple cameras to capture footage of each event – at around 2,400 frames per second.

In the decades since, around 10,000 of these films sat around gathering dust in high-security vaults across the country. The film material itself was slowly decomposing.

For the past six years,  Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) weapon physicist Greg Spriggs and a team of experts have been working hard to restore the data those films contain. They’ve been hunting down, scanning, reanalyzing, and declassifying the decomposing films.

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To date, the team has released nearly 300 videos – all of which can be viewed on their YouTube playlist.

In the following video, Spriggs explains the project:

Here’s a chilling recent video release:

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Here’s a random selection of particularly eerie videos.

There isn’t any audio, which makes the footage all the more creepy.

H/T to Digg

Lily Dane is a staff writer for The Daily Sheeple. Her goal is to help people to “Wake the Flock Up!”