Virtually every day, I wish I could turn away and not pay attention to what’s happening. Years ago as an undergraduate, Steve Sailer told me candidly not to pay attention to race. It wasn’t worth it.

To let it go.

I was prepared to do just this, until a friend of mine I grew up with was murdered in the streets of Atlanta back in 2011. Her sin? Her crime? Being white.

It’s been almost 10 years and not a day goes by that I don’t think about Brittney Watts.

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She was gunned down by a black male engorged by anti-white hatred learned through white privilege teachings in college, compelling him to target two other white females in a racial shooting spree virtually no one remembers.

Save me.

Daily.

We aren’t supposed to remember these names. We aren’t supposed to remember what happened to them or how they were murdered. How their final moments on earth passed them by, and just who/whom ended their lives.

But I do.

Her Name Is Mary Ann Elvington. [Suspect in elderly Horry Co. woman’s death had extensive criminal history, WPDE.COM, APRIL 1, 2021]:

Officials arrested Dominique Davonah Brand, 29, of Marion, for his connection to the kidnapping and murder of 80-year-old Mary Ann Elvington on Wednesday, according to a tweet from the Horry County Police Dept.

A source connected to the investigation told us Brand turned himself in Wednesday to authorities.

Brand is also charged with possession of a firearm by a felon and possession of a firearm during the commission of a violent crime, the post said.

ABC15 requested a background check on Brand from the State Law Enforcement Division. According to the background check information, his criminal history is lengthy:

  • In 2008, Brand was convicted on two misdemeanor petty larceny charges out of the city of Marion. He was sentenced to 15 days in jail, but that was suspended if he paid a fine and restitution.
  • In 2009, Brand sentenced under the youthful offenders act on a non-violent second degree burglary charge. The sentence was not to exceed six years in prison.
  • In June 2011, Marion Police charged Brand with 10 second degree burglary charges and seven petty larceny charges.
  • In September 2011, Marion County Sheriff’s deputies charged Brand with three counts of second degree burglary and two counts of grand larceny.
  • In October 2011, Marion Police charged him with malicious injury to personal property; breaking into auto tanks where fuel is stored; two counts of malicious injury to real property; two counts of grand larceny; and four counts second degree burglary.
  • In 2012, he was in court on all of those 2011 charges where he was convicted on multiple violent second degree burglary charge and sentenced to 15 years in prison on all charges to run concurrently. He was also convicted on other lesser charges and was ordered to pay restitution.
  • He is now facing kidnapping, possession of a weapon during a violent crime, possession of a firearm by a convicted violent felon and murder charges in connection with the death of Elvington.

Chrysti Shain, with the South Carolina Department of Corrections, said Brand was admitted to SCDC under the Youthful Offender Act on Sept. 19, 2009.

He was released to Marion County YOA parole on Feb. 2, 2010. His sentence was satisfied on July 21, 2011.

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He was readmitted to SCDC on Feb. 10, 2012 after pleading guilty to five counts of second-degree burglary from Marion County. He was sentenced to 15 years, of which he is required to serve one-third before being eligible for parole.

He was released on parole in Marion County on April 13, 2018.

“If he had not been released on parole, he would have been released on supervised reentry in June 2019. His official max-out date was December 2019,” she said.

The investigation into Elvington’s death is still ongoing across multiple jurisdictions with the assistance of local, state, and federal authorities.

Several deputies along with the SLED were gathered Wednesday afternoon outside a home on Pine Street in Marion.

We confirmed with Sheriff Brian Wallace that this house was searched in connection to Elvington’s murder case.

Elvington was reported missing and a search was launched Sunday. Her car was located by authorities first in Marion County, and her body was later found Monday.

Elvington’s longtime pastor at Mt. Olive Baptist Church told us he is relieved an arrest has been made so that her family can start to heal.

“We were very excited, very relieved to hear of this person being apprehended, it does bring a measure of peace. Like I said, it doesn’t undo all the evil that has been done but it does help heal the heart to know this person has been stopped” said Stephen Vipperman.

It would be a disservice to the memory of my friend Brittney Watts if I didn’t keep going and document what’s happening across America.

We aren’t supposed to notice the Anti-White wave attempting to capsize the nation our ancestors built on this continent, and the only duty we have is to stand against this force and never, ever capitulate.

No, it’s bigger than that.

It’s to say their names. And to document what happened.

I wish I didn’t care. But, in the memory of my friend Brittney Watts, I do.

Her Name Is Mary Ann Elvington (a loving Christian woman), a beautiful white grandmother, murdered by a black career criminal.

Were white privilege real, the only name preached by the corporate media would be Mary Ann Elvington. Instead, all we hear about is George Floyd.

Courtesy of UNZ