(Natural News) The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) has warned people to stop using popular Peloton treadmills after reports of 39 injuries, including a child’s death. However, the company remains defiant and says it has no plans to stop selling the exercise equipment.

The product at the center of the controversy is the $4,295 Peloton Tread+. The treadmill comes equipped with a 32-inch touchscreen that allows users who pay a subscription fee to access live and on-demand classes and enables people to run at speeds of up to 12.5 miles per hour.

According to the CPSC, there have been multiple reports of children getting pulled under the treadmill or entrapped under the machine, and they urged users with small children and pets to stop using it immediately.

Their statement added: “The Commission has found that the public health and safety requires this notice to warn the public quickly of the hazard. To date, CPSC is aware of 39 incidents including one death. CPSC staff believes the Peloton Tread+ poses serious risks to children for abrasions, fractures, and death.”

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The CPSC also posted a disturbing video online showing a young child appearing to get sucked into the treadmill after reaching beneath the machine to retrieve a ball, while Good Morning America spoke to a family whose young daughter suffered severe scrapes and bruises after being sucked under a Peloton treadmill.

Peloton doesn’t seem too concerned about the reports, and they pushed back on the CPSC warnings in a statement, saying: “The company is troubled by the Consumer Product Safety Commission’s (CPSC) unilateral press release about the Peloton Tread+ because it is inaccurate and misleading. There is no reason to stop using the Tread+, as long as all warnings and safety instructions are followed.”

The company admitted last month that a child had died in a tragic accident involving a Tread+. The child’s age and location were not released.

In response to the dangers, Consumer Reports pulled its recommendation for the product; it had previously held the #1 spot in their treadmill rankings. Shares of Peloton fell more than 7 percent on Monday after the warning was issued, and they are down around 30 percent for the year after a strong 2020 thanks largely to increasing numbers of people working out at home during the pandemic.

Feds issue warning over treadmills that injure unsupervised kids, yet they encourage vaccines that kill people

The fact that a child died because of this product is undeniably tragic. But it’s interesting how one death from a treadmill is enough to prompt the federal government to issue a warning, but it’s radio silence when people are dying from COVID-19 vaccines. In fact, investigations into the Johnson & Johnson vaccine aside, they continue to downplay people’s very real COVID-19 vaccine injuries and encourage people to get the jab despite the many risks.

The Peloton Tread+ could certainly benefit from some design tweaks that improve safety and parents should absolutely be vigilant when it comes to their kids and exercise equipment, but why are these 39 injuries getting so much attention in the media and from federal agencies when more than 56,000 adverse events have been reported so far from COVID-19 vaccines?

There have been at least 7,971 serious injuries and 2,342 deaths reported since mid-December, although plenty of other cases go unreported to the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System. They may have taken the blood clot reports seriously and put a temporary halt to the Johnson & Johnson vaccine, but it won’t be surprising if the investigation ultimately clears it and it is given to people anyway. These vaccines are far deadlier than treadmills, and the public deserves to be warned about the dangers.

Sources for this article include:

ZeroHedge.com

FoxBusiness.com

NaturalNews.com

Edition.CNN.com

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